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Topography
The following information was adapted from "Watershed Resource Papers" developed for the Dowagiac River Watershed Project by Langworthy, Strader, LeBlanc, & Associates, Inc.

CHANGES IN TOPOGRAPHY The presence of changes in topography is not always readily identified as a natural resource. Steep slopes and rolling hillsides -- unlike other resources such as groundwater -- do not have clearly defined public benefits. If disturbed, these areas cannot be restored. Topography exists in a balance with vegetation, precipitation, and wind. Maintaining stable slopes helps prevent non-point source pollution of water resources (particularly soil erosion) while preserving a distinctive feature of the local landscape.


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The presence of changes in topography is not always readily identified as a natural resource. Steep slopes and rolling hillsides -- unlike other resources such as groundwater -- do not have clearly defined public benefits. If disturbed, these areas cannot be restored.

Topography exists in a balance with vegetation, precipitation, and wind. Maintaining stable slopes helps prevent non-point source pollution of water resources (particularly soil erosion) while preserving a distinctive feature of the local landscape.
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